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New Research Study Focuses On Antibodies To Stop Multiple Myeloma

Home/New Research Study Focuses On Antibodies To Stop Multiple Myeloma

New Research Study Focuses On Antibodies To Stop Multiple Myeloma

Update on another new anti-myeloma research study, post ASCO:

Immunomedics doses first patient in Phase I/II multiple myeloma trial

Immunomedics, a biopharmaceutical company, has announced the dosing of the first patient in a Phase I/II clinical trial of the doxorubicin conjugate of milatuzumab for the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma.

The open-label, multi-center Phase I/II study aims to evaluate the safety and tolerability of milatuzumab-doxorubicin conjugate in patients with recurrent or refractory multiple myeloma, and to obtain preliminary information on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity.

The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) will be administered intravenously on days one, four, eight and 11 every 21 days for up to eight treatment cycles. Four different dose levels of the doxorubicin conjugate of milatuzumab will be studied in groups of three to six patients. Once an optimal dose has been found, up to an additional 30 patients will be studied at that dose level.

Cynthia Sullivan, president and CEO of Immunomedics, said: “We are pleased to have initiated the patient dosing of our first ADC. Our next ADC candidates will be based on SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan that has been approved for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. We plan to link it with our proprietary humanized antibodies that target solid cancers such as breast, colorectal, lung and ovarian.”

I found this on TradingMarkets.com, an online investment service.  Like I wrote about in Chicago, there are darn near as many business and market researchers at these oncology conventions as there are scientists.  Big money attracts lots of interest–and even a hint of news about a successful new cancer therapy can send a stock soaring.
 
Feel good and keep smiling!  Pat