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Pre-American Society Of Hematology (ASH) News Starting To Break

Home/Pre-American Society Of Hematology (ASH) News Starting To Break

Pre-American Society Of Hematology (ASH) News Starting To Break

I have been biding my time, waiting to write an article previewing next month’s American Society of Hematology (ASH) meetings. 

I had already received a few pre-conference announcements.  But today, Millennium’s head of PR forwarded me their “Curtainraiser” ASH Preview Press Release.  So no better time to start previewing December’s ASH meetings than right now!

Actually, things have been unexpectedly quiet on the ASH promotional front.  Last year seemed to have much more pre-ASH “buzz.”  News and rumors were swirling all about the Internet.  Maybe this year everyone is just getting a late start.  More probably, things will be less dramatic since last year’s primary news maker, Onyx Pharmaceutical’s carfilzomib, has been put on hold by the FDA

From an informational perspective, this may not be such a bad thing.  Carfilzomib news overshadowed a number of smaller but very important research study results which were presented last year at ASH.

ASH is the largest–and arguably most important–blood cancer related meeting/conference each year.  Last year ASH took place in snowy New Orleans.  This year the five day event will be held at the convention center in Orlando, Florida.  Good news for me, since I live less than two hours away–and the weather should be much better.  Really, it snowed two nights while I was in New Orleans.  No big deal if I had packed a warm coat!

Not that it mattered.  I was stuck in meetings, attending receptions or hiding in my hotel room typing furiously on my laptop keyboard.

There is so much to cover at ASH.  It is a very busy, exciting time for me.  I will be there again this year.  I wouldn’t miss it–too much information all of us need to know.  News about ongoing research studies, new drugs and treatment strategies.  It is such a hopeful time for me.  My goal is to help my readers feel the same way.

But ASH is still three weeks away.  Still, there is plenty of multiple myeloma related research news available now for me to share.  Watch for twice daily posts and articles starting today as we approach the big event.

Here is the first part of Millennium’s Preview Press Release I mentioned earlier:

VELCADE® (BORTEZOMIB) INDUCTION, MAINTENANCE AND SUBCUTANEOUS DATA IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA TO BE FEATURED IN ORAL PRESENTATIONS AT AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEMATOLOGY ANNUAL MEETING

— Data on use of VELCADE in follicular lymphoma to be featured in additional oral presentation —

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., November 10, 2010 – Millennium: The Takeda Oncology Company today announced abstracts from studies involving six molecules in the Company’s portfolio have been accepted for presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) to be held December 4–7, 2010 in Orlando, Florida. The abstracts include oral presentations across a spectrum of hematologic malignancies.

These data include presentations on VELCADE induction, maintenance and subcutaneous administration in multiple myeloma, as well safety and efficacy in relapsed follicular lymphoma. Other oral presentations will feature Millennium pipeline molecules MLN4924 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) pivotal data in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and Phase II results in systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Brentuximab vedotin is being developed jointly with Seattle Genetics, Inc. (NASDAQ: SGEN).

“VELCADE research being presented at this year’s ASH meeting further defines its use in multiple myeloma and explores its potential use in relapsed follicular lymphoma,” said Nancy Simonian, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, Millennium. “The data from pipeline molecules MLN4924 and brentuximab vedotin are equally exciting and demonstrate Millennium’s commitment to pioneering new therapies for hematologic malignancies.”
 
More to follow tomorrow.
So glad to help!  Feel good and keep smiling!  Pat