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New ASH data supports treating high risk smoldering myeloma patients. But is this really a good idea?

Home/Supplements/Drugs, Therapy/New ASH data supports treating high risk smoldering myeloma patients. But is this really a good idea?

New ASH data supports treating high risk smoldering myeloma patients. But is this really a good idea?

I don’t post a lot of information about MGUS and smoldering multiple myeloma on this site.

Sorry about that!

There are two reasons for this.  One is that I am so confident that the dozens of new, anti-myeloma therapies will be available by the time a smoldering myeloma patient needs them, I probably don’t put enough emphasis on it.

In my view, most patients who are currently smoldering are going to live a long, long time.

Additionally, up to this point there really hasn’t been any approved therapies for either disorder.

That is, until now?

Read this excerpt from an article about smoldering multiple myeloma therapy  in MedpageTODAY and see what you think:

ASH: Don’t Wait to Treat Smoldering Myeloma

By Michael Smith, North American Correspondent, MedPage Today
Published: December 16, 2011

Reviewed byRobert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

SAN DIEGO — The classic clinical approach to smoldering multiple myeloma is watchful waiting, but immediate treatment offers a better outcome for some patients, a researcher said here.

In asymptomatic patients at high risk for developing active disease, induction therapy with lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone followed by lenalidomide maintenance slowed progression, according to María-Victoria Mateos, MD, PhD, of the Hospital Clinico Universitario in Salamanca, Spain.

The therapy also improved overall survival with acceptable tolerability and no safety signals, Mateos reported in an oral session at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology…

Really?  Should a smoldering patient really begin treatment before they have to?  And what about long term overall survival data?  (There is none.)  I would be concerned that starting therapy early would allow a patient’s myeloma to become resistant to therapy.

Then, what happens when a patient needs a drug to work but it doesn’t anymore?

See what you think and read more details by CLICKING HERE.

Don’t get me wrong.  Results form this clinical study seem impressive.  It’s just for me, there are far more questions than answers here.

Feel good and keep smiling!  Pat