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Monday morning homework

Home/About Pat, Transplants/Monday morning homework

Monday morning homework

Last month I was featured in a Nature Magazine article about multiple myeloma and stem cell transplants:

Stem cells: Transplants on trial

By Elie Dolgin

They included this handsome picture, too!

Point of fact, the photo editors–located in England–flipped the captions of the two pictures I sent them.  The actual stem cell infusion pic was left-out.  This one shows a Moffitt Cancer Center nurses preparing to remove my central line when it was time to go home after 21 days.  But what’s the difference, right?

During November, Mr. Dolgin would call me every three days or so to ask a few more questions.  Nice guy–and very thorough.

I know he worked hard on the article, and I was glad to help.

But I never expected the story would end-up being so much about me.  I thought that I was simply providing him with some background info.

I thought the headline was a bit misleading.  Overall, I think Elie does a nice job laying-out some of the transplant options facing myeloma patients these days.

I told him about how UAMS/Arkansas was using tandem transplants and the more aggressive Total Therapy.  I’m glad that he included some of that perspective in the piece.

Anyway, give it a look if you get a chance.  Simply CLICK HERE.

Moving on, this weekend I spent some extra time and wrote an in-depth article about TBL-12, an exotic anti-cancer supplement composed of a variety of different sea creatures.

While early trial results look hopeful, it was the way this supplement–and the way the manufacturer,  Unicorn Pacific–is positioning itself in the market place that intrigued me most.

Not really a drug or supplement, TBL-12 seems to defy classification.  And the way the compound’s manufacturer, Unicorn Pacific, is trying to raise funds in order to continue clinical trials is exotic as well.  A lot of “outside the box” thinking involved with this one.

So go back to Sunday and check that article out, too.  CLICK HERE for a shortcut.

That’s a lot of homework to be giving-out on a Monday morning, but I think both articles are worth the trouble–and easy, informative reads.

Feel good and keep smiling!  Pat