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More about measles virus clinical trial: Could myeloma cells be killed so fast it might endanger patients?

Home/Research, Supplements/Drugs/More about measles virus clinical trial: Could myeloma cells be killed so fast it might endanger patients?

More about measles virus clinical trial: Could myeloma cells be killed so fast it might endanger patients?

Yesterday I re-visited the topic of a new anti-myeloma therapy Mayo Clinic researchers are investigating.

My post focused on a Phase 1 study my friend, Mike, just joined called

MCo38C, “A Phase 1 Trial of Systemic Administration of (Edmonston Strain) of Measles Virus, Genetically Engineered to Express NIS, with or without Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma.”

According to the trial enrollment materials Mike mailed me last week, the study goals include:

* Testing the safety of MV-NIS

* To determine the max dose of the virus that can be safely administered in patients with myeloma (with or without cyclophosphamide)

* To dermine where the virus travels, how long it stays there and how it multiplies.

* To evaluate the effects of the virus on the body

* To evaluate the impact the virus has on the amount of disease in patients

The study plan is to have up to 54 patients take part.  Half of the patients will recieve MV-NIS without cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) ad half will receive MV-NIS with cyclophosphamide.

I found this part of the study to be very interesting.  Apparently, Cytoxan may become a part of this therapy–not so much to help kill myeloma cells–but to weaken a patient’s immune system enough to allow the modified measles virus to work more effectively.

This one year study was conceived by a team of Mayo Clinic myeloma specialists, led by Dr. Angela Dispenzieri.

Dr. Dispenzieri is both a clinician and researcher.  She is best known for her work with the original study group which pomalidomide for the first time.

As clinical studies go, my impression is the number of expected side-effects in the subject patients are expected to be minimal.  But I did get a “kick” out of this statement:

“If the virus kills myeloma cells too rapidly, the dead cells can cause a syndrome called ‘tumor lysis’ syndrome, which can cause salt imbalances in the blood and even kidney failure.”

Assuming any renal failure would be reversible, what a nice problem!  These patients should be so lucky…

I think I will stop on that hopefully positive note.   I will update you from time to time on Mike’s progress.

Good luck, good friend!

Feel good and keep smiling!  Pat